Fitness Articles Archives - Fitness Inside Out

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18 February 20200

So why are warm up exercises important? You may be tempted to skip the warm-up the next time you workout. Resist that temptation as a good warm up reduces your chances of injury or aggravating an old injury.

Most warm-up sessions will include a combination of cardiovascular exercises, stretching and strength drills. The cardiovascular exercises are designed to increase circulation, increase body temperature and bring the heart rate up, while stretching warms the muscles and prepare them for the movements they will be required to carry out during the activity.

To warm up, gently use all the same muscles you plan to use for the fitness activity. The length of your warm-up will depend on how intensely you plan to exercise. Generally, the more intensely you plan to exercise the longer you will want to warm up. For most people, between 5 and 30 minutes is sufficient.

The most important reason for doing a warm up is to prevent injury; keeping the muscles warm will prevent acute injuries such as hamstring strains and will stave off overuse injuries by allowing the body to prepare steadily and safely.

For tips on how to warm up ask your mobile personal trainer check out the video below for a low impact cardio workout for an all over warm up.

 


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24 January 20200

You have just returned back to your regular training routine or just getting started program. The next day your muscles are sore or even worse 2 days later. So what is the truth about muscle soreness?

Your suffering from DOMS, Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness .

The soreness is the result of a microtrauma. Stressing a muscle beyond what it is accustomed to will cause damage that stimulates an adaptation response. This response is felt as painful soreness that discourages you from moving the affected muscle.

On a microscopic and hormonal level adaptation your body is healing torn and inflamed muscle fibres’. White blood cells will clear out damaged tissues as the body secretes hormones like IGF-1 and testosterone to increase protein synthesis which adds new mass. Increased muscle mass will create greater strength.

Relief from DOMS will heal itself as the normal process of circulation. If you want to accelerate this process you need to increase blood circulation, simply by moving your body. Keep up your water, stretch and if the pain is too much you can take an anti-inflammatory. i.e ibuprofen.

 


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24 January 20200

Do you struggle keeping motivated with your home workout? It’s easy to lose focus and motivation when you’re by yourself training at home. Let’s face it, it’s easy to get distracted or find an excuse to put it off tomorrow.

So here at Fitness Inside Out we have put together some helpful tips to get you exercising even when no one is looking.

Create Your Own Space.

If you have a home gym or an area already set up so you can jump in and fit in a sneaky workout  before work or before dinner.  You may wish to have a computer for playing workout videos or a  even TV.

Diarize a Workout.

Plan the time of day and what days you will do your workout. Getting it a part of your regular routine is critical. Schedule it around your regular commitments and preferred time to work out.

Workout with a Partner.

Train with your partner or a buddy. The accountability that a partner can bring can motivate and inspire.

No Social Media.

Avoid catching up on Social Media in-between sets. Before you know it 10 mins gone and your 30 min workout turns into a 60 min workout. This can screw up the routine and your body cools down and you lose momentum.

Prepare Your Workouts in Advance.

Speak to your personal trainer about getting planned workout routine. Depending on your availability of time and when you want to do your workout, it may be a 30min daily routine or 60 min session. Your personal trainer will guide you what is best for you and your goals.

Don’t have a personal trainer, talk to us about hiring a personal trainer and or writing a program for you.

Wear Workout Gear.

Don’t work out in your pyjamas, put on your work out gear and gym shoes.

Enclothed cognition is a psychological phenomenon that suggests certain clothes may trigger mental changes that can impact performance positively.

Turn Up the Sound.

Similar to getting on the right workout gear music is just as important. Now you may not want to have the sound blaring through the house and waking up the rest of the house during your early morning workout. Switch to the headset and find some tunes that are just right for the cardio or yoga routine.

Hire a Personal Trainer.

When all else fails keeping motivated with your home workout, hire a personal trainer for a extra session. They will keep you motivate, accountable and on track to reach your goals in 2020.

 


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8 November 20190

Does Exercise boost your mood?

Many times after a workout we feel great, not only do we feel we have accomplished something but our mood is improved. It is believed that exercise triggers changes in the brain boosting levels of serotonin, the feel good hormone. Research has shown 20 minutes of exercise helped women with major depression feel less depressed and anxious – but there was one important difference coaching.

Read the article – Study Shows Coaching (In a class or with a trainer) Lessens depression.

Source – Myfitnesspal

For more information about mobile personal training and how we can help you kickstart your fitness regime contact us today on 1300-735-790,


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22 October 20190

How To Stretch Your Quads Correctly

To be able to answer this question, we must first look at the anatomy of the quadriceps muscles. The quads (quadriceps femoris) are made up of four muscles (hence quads!), rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis. They all join at the bottom of the thigh and form the patella tendon. This tendon crosses the kneecap (patella), and inserts on the tibia – main bone of the lower leg.

If you have ever experienced knee issues you may have heard of the vastus medialis muscle, sometimes known as the VMO (vastus medialis obliquis). This muscle is notorious for being the weakest quad muscle that directly affects the patella. It attaches on the medial side (inside) of the patella, and if it is not strong enough, the risk of the patella being pulled laterally (outwards) increases. If this occurs, then knee pain arises.

The infamous ITB (ilio tibial band) works with the vastus lateralis to help pull the patella outwards (laterally)every time you activate your quads. These two muscles are considerably strong in comparison to the vastus medialis. Most active people need to do specific work to ensure they have equal length tension relationship with the muscles affecting both sides of their patella, so when they use their quads, the patella moves in the femoral groove comfortably, and does not get pulled out of alignment.

Put these factors together and it should become obvious that stretching the quads should be done in a manner to ensure the medialis is not overstretched compared to the lateralis, and that there is correct alignment with the upper and lower leg, including the knee joint. There are plenty of specific exercises that can be performed to ensure there is equal tension between the
muscles that affect the patella both laterally and medially; but that is for another article. This article is specifically about stretching the muscles of the front of the thigh correctly to help prevent muscle imbalances around the knee.

There is a lot of science behind stretching. There is also a number of different ways to stretch, these include static, dynamic, ballistic, range of motion, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF), active,passive and isometric, all serve different purposes for what you want to achieve as well as your current condition.

Watch this video on How To Stretch Your Quads Correctly

By Kerrie Hains
Fitness Inside Out – Mobile Personal Trainer
Brisbane, QLD


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1 October 20190

Does your local park have an Outdoor Gym?

Australia has some of the best weather, sunshine and temperatures 15 to 25 degrees daily, yet many of us spend hours inside sitting at a screen. Training or exercising outdoors has the benefits of getting our daily dose of vitamin D, breathing fresh air and the mental stabilization of being in touch with the earth.

Many local councils across Australia have installed outside gyms to encourage the use of the parks for fitness. Check Out your local park for an outdoor gym.

Read more…


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15 September 20190

When ever we start with a new client we often ask, “what motivates you to get a personal trainer?”. Understanding your motivation is key, as it not only allows your trainer to help you set realistic goals, but also we get an insight what drives you.

Commonly we hear, I want to look for my wedding or I am going on a ski trip or I need to lose weight for my health.  But the other day I was reading some articles online and found this article from Popsugar about inspiring women in movies and I thought yes this could be good for motivation too. Motivation comes from many places so why not the movies too.

Films to Watch About Women in Sport – from Popsugar


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30 August 20190

Regular physical activity is vital for good physical and mental health. It helps improve your overall health and fitness, maintain a healthy weight, reduce your risk for many chronic diseases and promote good mental health.

Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines recommend that at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on most, preferably all, days is required for good health. This is the same for women and men. However, only 54 per cent of Australian women meet these guidelines.

Some of the barriers to physical exercise that women face include family responsibilities, body image and perceptions of safety.

Why Women Do Physical Activity

Barriers to physical activity for women

Tips for women to overcome barriers to exercise

If need assistance in getting moving contact Fitness Inside Out today, discuss how we can get you moving.


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30 August 20190

Do you have headaches? Pain in your neck, shoulders and / or back? Do you activate the stabilisers in your neck correctly, to support your head?

Just like the lower back has spinal stabilisers, the neck has spinal stabilisers that perform the function of stabilising the vertebrae in the neck. This is to ensure the vertebra do not “jam” on each other and impinge the discs and nerves between each vertebra. It also allows the bigger mover muscles the opportunity to do their job, i.e. move the head, while the stabilisers do their job, i.e. provide spinal stability.

If our head is in the wrong position, it reduces the ability of the spinal stabilisers to activate correctly. Once this happens, the bigger muscles that are responsible for moving the head try to do the job of stabilising the neck as well as moving the head. This can cause headaches, neck pain, shoulder pain, back pain and even pain down the arms.

It is recommended everyone learn how to activate their deep neck flexors to help ensure the correct muscles are performing their roles at all times.

We should all try to assess and reassess our posture intermittently throughout each day to ensure we are in ideal posture, just so we don’t put unnecessary stress and load on muscles. We should also all know how to activate our deep neck flexors, to help ensure these muscles are doing their job i.e. stabilising the neck and helping to maintain ideal neck and head posture.

Everyone should know how to activate these muscles and do regular checkups on themselves to ensure correct technique.

By Kerrie Hains
Fitness Inside Out – Mobile Personal Trainer

 


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9 August 20190

Do you cross your legs when you exercise? Performing exercises with your legs crossed is really not recommended; if you want to prevent injuries. The reason is that, generally you will always cross your legs the same way. If you clasp your hands you will find that you want to do it with either the left or right hand in front. If you try to change it, it feels very unfamiliar, even uncomfortable.

It is the same with your legs. We generally do the same way each and every time, especially when exercising. If you have a close look at the spine in these two pictures you may notice in the picture on the left that the pelvis on the right hand side is slightly lower than the left. You may also notice there is a slight curvature in the lumbar spine toward the right.

In the picture on the right hand side, the legs are not crossed. The pelvis is showing relatively horizontal, and the vertebrae is showing almost vertical, as it should.

If you exercise with your legs crossed, and you cross them the same way every time, the risk of you ending up with a functional scoliosis (curvature of the spine) is quite high. Most exercises that we do with our legs crossed involve activating our core musculature; these include push ups, chin ups, crunches, to name a few. Consider the slight tilt in the spine, with repeated repetitions or long sustained holds of core muscle activation.

 Try to get in the habit of not crossing your legs while you exercise to give your trunk it’s best possible chance at maintaining ideal alignment.

by Kerrie Hains


Fitness Inside Out – Mobile Personal Trainer